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And especially for Tom: McCarthy using repetition and polysyndeta to great effect. Legolas Send a noteboard - 18/04/2011 07:32:43 PM
One of the best and most remarkable paragraphs in the book (no worries, there's not much in the way of spoilers for those who try to avoid those, nor is there any gory violence in it) is the following one:


"And they are dancing, the board floor slamming under the jackboots and the fiddlers grinning hideously over their canted pieces. Towering over them all is the judge and he is naked dancing, his small feet lively and quick and now in doubletime and bowing to the ladies, huge and pale and hairless, like an enormous infant. He never sleeps, he says. He says he'll never die. He bows to the fiddlers and sashays backwards and throws back his head and laughs deep in his throat and he is a great favorite, the judge. He wafts his hat and the lunar dome of his skull passes palely under the lamps and he swings about and takes possession of one of the fiddles and he pirouettes and makes a pass, two passes, dancing and fiddling at once. His feet are light and nimble. He never sleeps. He says that he will never die. He dances in light and shadow and he is a great favorite. He never sleeps, the judge. He is dancing, dancing. He says that he will never die."
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I had been considering this one - 18/04/2011 07:10:06 PM 1048 Views
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Re: You could read Winnetou and critique Karl May? - 19/04/2011 08:08:49 AM 1128 Views
And especially for Tom: McCarthy using repetition and polysyndeta to great effect. - 18/04/2011 07:32:43 PM 1216 Views
I kind of want to read this now. *NM* - 20/04/2011 05:54:54 AM 569 Views

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