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Journal: Entry for Avendesora

So it's official, (again).

Author: Avendesora Send a noteboard

Posted: 21/05/2010 12:39:57 PM

Views: 4298

My son does have Asperger Syndrome. I already knew this, but it was good for my husband to finally understand, though. It was also nice to know I wasn't overanalyzing.

The diagnostic team will recommend to the school district that he be kept in the typically developing (normal) kindergarten. They will recommend that the classrroom have an extra aid in it for when my son has difficulties staying on task, during emotional setbacks, and give him a short break when he's overstimulated. Academically he is further ahead than his peers.

At least now I know I'm not crazy for thinking he was a little over the top with his rigidity and low frustration tolerance.

See, he is borderline for being on the spectrum at all, so I wasn't sure if he was having more generalized anxiety symptoms, bipolar, sensory integration disorder, or what. He does not have a special interest, he is able to engage in pretend play fairly well, he has very few repetitive behaviors (that just recently emerged), and he has a great sense of humor. He has lots of friends. He also understands when I'm making a generalization. He also has not had ANY sleep problems. So he reached the cutoff for being on the autism spectrum, but when you do the just Asperger checklist he fits the checklist quite thoroughly.

I feel relieved.
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This is so familiar.
I noticed these same things in my son years ago. I had hoped he would mature out of them. Even homeschooled him because of it. I had to convince his biological father that getting doctors involved is a good thing. I keep second guessing my own perception of things. I know there has to be things I can do to help him more, ways I don't know of to help him recognize how to deal with life on his own, and maybe even get back into a classroom so he isn't so lonely all day with me. Thanks for posting Avey! *big hugs*

This is so familiar.
I noticed these same things in my son years ago. I had hoped he would mature out of them. Even homeschooled him because of it. I had to convince his biological father that getting doctors involved is a good thing. I keep second guessing my own perception of things. I know there has to be things I can do to help him more, ways I don't know of to help him recognize how to deal with life on his own, and maybe even get back into a classroom so he isn't so lonely all day with me. Thanks for posting Avey! *big hugs*

*sigh* sorry for the double post. *NM*
it's good to know at least
once you know, you can work with it :) Hopefully his life runs relatively smoothly from here on out, particularly since he seems to be relatively low on the spectrum :)
I'm glad that you know.
My wife's working on her Masters right now in Behavioral Analysis, and works with many people with various disabilities, but primarily autism, asperger's, and things of that nature. The hardest part for her is often finding a way to get the family on board and working with their children, so I'm really happy to see that you're into it and ready to do what it takes to make the best of the situation.

There's a lot that can be done with good teachers and a solid program in the school district. I'm happy to hear that they're going to keep him in a typically developing classroom. I don't have a degree or anything, but I seem to feel that this is almost always a better choice if the teachers are willing to do their part to make it work.

*hugs* I hope everything goes smoothly. Thanks for the post! :)
It is good to know that.
Tim had Asperger's when he was younger. He mostly trained himself out of a lot of the traits. If you have any questions, or want more personal advice, I'm sure he'd be happy to help out.

As ASD runs in his family (one of his uncle's and his brother are both very autistic, and we're pretty sure that his Dad and his other uncle have many of the traits), we're very likely to have children with some part of the spectrum.